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Multi-faith

Multi-faith

Faith Perspectives

We believe that awareness of how much we depend on the Earth with its abundance and diversity, is catching up with our realization that the natural environment is in crisis.

In SAFCEI’s work, we look at the core beliefs and values of the world’s religions, because they hold the keys to a relationship of respect and appreciation for nature.

Multi-faith leaders gather in Cape Town to celebrate the World Day of Prayer for Creation, September 2017.

Multi-faith dialogue built on cooperative interaction between different religious and or spiritual traditions is as ancient as religion itself.

Multi-faith dialogue based on equity, justice, and mutual respect for the Earth, is a way we can build a sustainable future for all. A multi-faith approach raises awareness about the diverse traditions that help people to grow spiritually through a deeper connection with the creation.

History

Multi-faith dialogue built on cooperative interaction between different religious and or spiritual traditions is as ancient as religion itself.

Multi-faith dialogue based on equity, justice, and mutual respect for the Earth, is a way we can build a sustainable future for all. A multi-faith approach raises awareness about the diverse traditions that help people to grow spiritually through a deeper connection with the creation.

Eco-Perspectives

 

There is common ground among many faiths regarding:

  • Acknowledging the inherent value of nature that goes beyond its services to us.
  • Practicing gratitude and respect for the services of nature that support life.
  • Understanding that humans are part of a complex, interconnected web of life where the health of the natural system is directly linked to our health.

Collective multi-faith action is exerting pressure on decision-makers at international climate change and socio-economic meetings. Faith leaders are calling for a future for nature and for us, through the redistribution of investment from fossil fuels to renewable energy, before we reach a climate tipping point. Multi-faith dialogue and action can play a critical role in promoting a new human ecological consciousness based on co-operation and not domination, either of people or of nature.

Earth aware Quakers propose living in a “right relationship” with the Earth to preserve the integrity, resilience, and beauty of the commonwealth of life.

There is no room in Buddhism for inaction as non-action is itself an action which will have consequences. Buddhism therefore invites us to be aware and to reflect upon the urgency of the environmental situation and to act.

Traditional African Religion holds that all things were created by the Supreme Being for a harmonious continuity, and as such there must be a relationship of mutual obligation between all created things.

Islam: And He (Allah) has raised the cosmos, and set up (for all things) the balance. So do not transgress the balance. Weigh, therefore, (your deeds) with justice. (in Surah al-Rahmam, chapter 55, vs 7-9)

Judaism: “The Eternal God took the man and placed him in the Garden of Eden, to keep it and to watch over it.” (Genesis 2:15)

Christian: “Creation is not a property, which we can rule over at will; or, even less, is the property of only a few. Creation is a wonderful gift that God has given us, so that we care for it and we use it for the benefit of all, always with great respect and gratitude.” (Pope Francis)

Browse through our online library for more faith community resources.